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Roaster's Choice 1lb. Fresh Roast Coffee Delivered Each Month - 3, 6, 9 or 12 month subscription

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High Rise ‘Round the World Six Coffee Sampler

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High Rise Holiday Blend (1Lb. bag)

$15.00

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High Rise Holiday Blend (1Lb. bag)

$15.00

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Our Vienesse blend is an exquisite combinaiton of dark roast beans from Uganda and Brazil light roasted beans from Panama.  The contrast of light and dark roast beans crates a rich and delicious deep flavor.  We think you'll find this coffee packs kick, but withh a smooth finish.

Our Vienesse blend is an exquisite combinaiton of dark roast beans from Uganda and Brazil light roasted beans from Panama.  The contrast of light and dark roast beans crates a rich and delicious deep flavor.  We think you'll find this coffee packs kick, but withh a smooth finish.

What is specialty coffee, anyway?

Unlike commercial coffee, which is usually roasted and packaged in large plants, under nationally advertised brand names, specialty coffee is roasted in small batches, using traditional methods.  Most often, specialty coffees are sold right where they are roasted. High quality product and hand craft coffee roasting are the hallmark of the small batch specialty roaster. What's the diff? Specialty coffees offer more choice than their commercial counterparts.  While commercial coffees only offer a limited blend or roast, specialty coffee proprietors offer consumers the opportunity to buy coffee by place of origin: Kenya, Sumatra, Colombia, Bali, etc. OR by specialty roast: French roast, Italian Roast, full city roast, etc… Non-European sounding names like Flores, Sumatra, Timor refer not to the roast, but to the origin of the bean.  A coffee labeled Colombian, for example, should consist entirely of beans from a single crop in a single country, Colombia. For the most part, single origin coffees are roasted about the same length of time, or to what the roaster feels is the optimum roast to bring out the distinctive qualities of each coffee.  In our case, you’ll find most of our single origin coffees are roasted medium to full city.  In addition to the country of origin, names can also include market names (Yirgacheffe – a growing region in Ethiopia), Grade names (Kenya AA – the ‘AA’ denotes the quality of the bean), and estate names (Chelbesa or HueHue Tenango).  I won’t dive down this rabbit hole today, as a full explanation would require two more written pages, at a minimum.  For more information, please see William Uker’s All About Coffee; It’s literally everything you ever wanted to know about coffee and more! European sounding names, on the other hand, generally refer to a specialty roast. Italian Roast, for example, has been roasted longer and appears somewhat darker than say, a Vienesse Roast.  Specialty roasts are usually blends, which is a mixture of two or more types of single origin beans.  In our case, we blend our single origin beans to create a flavor that is more complete –or complex- than the flavor produced by any one single origin bean.  Regardless of what you take home from High Rise, whether one of our fab single origins, or an amazing specialty blend, we guarantee it will be fresh.  The clock starts the second the beans leave the roaster. 

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What is specialty coffee, anyway?

Unlike commercial coffee, which is usually roasted and packaged in large plants, under nationally...

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Why is Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee SO expensive?

Not all Jamaican coffee is created equal.  Many of the coffees found in lowland Jamaica are sold cheaply and are mostly used as fillers in cheap blends. The highland coffees of Jamaica, all grown above 3,000 feet in elevation, on the other hand, rank among some of the world’s most distinguished and highly celebrated coffees, with Jamaica Blue Mountain being the world’s most expensive, and most controversial.  Generally, in the coffee growing world, the higher the growing altitude, the harder the bean; the harder the coffee bean, the higher the quality. In regard to Jamaica Blue Mountain coffee, not only are the beans hard, and thus high quality, the high altitude and steep grade of the Blue Mountain growing region make this coffee difficult- and expensive- to harvest.  The expense of the harvest, coupled with the high demand for Blue Mountain coffee in both the American and Japanese markets keep the cost of Jamaican Blue Mountain high.  Unfortunately, due to it's high retail price, many people, in one way or another have tried to profit from the extraordinary price demanded for Blue Mountain. Today, responsible roasters designate only estate-produced coffees grown at over 3,000 feet, in the Blue Mountain district of Jamaica, as being authentic Blue Mountain coffee. Less admirable retailers will attempt to pass off “Blue Mountain Style” Coffee or “Jamaica Blue Mountain Blends” as THE Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee. While these coffees may have some of the flavor characteristics of Blue Mountain coffee, they usually contain only a small amount of actual Blue Mountain beans, if any at all.  In addition, buyers should be skeptical in regard to coffees labeled Jamaican High Mountain. The High Mountain designation generally describes cheap Jamaican coffees that are grown at lower elevations on other parts of the island. High Mountain is not the same as Blue Mountain.   Our Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee is sourced from family-owned farms located near the Saint Andrew parish, nestled in the Grand Ridge of the Blue Mountains, Jamaica and grown at approx. 3200 ft. in elevation.  Coffee produced in the Jamaican Blue Mountains has a protected designation of origin (PDO) because of the renowned reputation of Blue Mountain coffee.  Coffee is intercropped with banana, Inga, mango and many other shade trees.  The Clydesdale wet-mill is the most modern in Jamaica with technology to recycle and treat water before returning it to the environment.  The dry mill, located in an economically underprivileged part of Kingston, employees over 600 women to hand sort coffee.  In addition to the social impact from stable employment, funds are also invested in projects to support over 30 schools. Notably, 80% of Jamaican Blue Mountain gets sold into the Japanese market.  

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Why is Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee SO expensive?

Not all Jamaican coffee is created equal.  Many of the coffees found in lowland Jamaica are sold ...

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Fair Trade Certification; What it is and how it applies to the coffee industry...

Fair Trade Certified products are food or craft products that have been proven to adhere to strict production standards set by one of two independent labeling organizations, Fair Trade USA or the Institute for Marketecology (IMO).  For coffee and cocoa specifically, in addition to prohibiting child labor practices and activities that degrade society and the environment, these certification standards require that the product is grown by small farmers in democratically organized cooperatives. In other words, you can be sure that any product labeled Fair Trade Certified was not produced using child labor or sweatshop conditions, and that the rights of all workers involved in the production process were respected.  You can also be sure that the cost of certification was high and required that the producer(s) invest heavily.  As a result, many farmers experience only a small increase in profit-if they receive any additional profit at all.  In addition, the higher product cost limits local access to the product itself. For our part, we carry many Fair Trade coffees; in many cases, they are some of the best coffees available at market. Additionally, we appreciate that the Fair Trade Standards in place are keeping the farm workers and the environment safe.  However, we also recognize that some of the best coffees in the world come from small micro farms that want to remain locally available and/or are unable to afford the costly certification process.   At the end of the day, we work hard to ensure that the beans we buy are from coffee farms using sustainable and fair work practices.  We don't want to miss out on a good coffee simply because the farmer can't afford the FT certification. We do not directly seek out FT beans, nor do we charge more for the FT products we do sell just because they are Fair Trade certified. Our sole mission is to provide high quality, ethically sourced beans, roast them to perfection and deliver them to your door fresh. For more information on Fair Trade practices and Fair Trade Certification, please refer to the following articles: http://www.darwinsmoney.com/fair-trade-criticism/ file:///C:/Users/API/Downloads/ruben_fort_-_world_development.pdf

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Fair Trade Certification; What it is and how it applies to the coffee industry...

Fair Trade Certified products are food or craft products that have been proven to adhere to stric...

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